OWNERS‎ > ‎MAINTENANCE‎ > ‎

CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS: s.sdcpm.com/carbon

1: IN WHAT AREAS  SHOULD THEY BE INSTALLED?  See more details here
      A: Outside each sleeping area. Recommended but not required in each sleeping room.
      B: On each floor level
      C: In any basement and finished attics

2: WHERE SHOULD THEY NOT BE INSTALLED  (AS PER KIDDE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS)
      A: K
Itchens, garages or furnace rooms (That may expose 
the sensor to substances that could damage or contaminate it )
      B: Areas where the temperature is colder than 0°C or hotter air ventilation than 40°C such as crawl spaces, attics, porches, and                       garages. 
      C: Within 1.5m. Of heating or cooking appliances. (Kidde 
Recommends 3m. To prevent nuisance alarms). 
      D: Near vents, flues, chimneys or any of ventilation openings
      E: Near ceiling fans, doors, windows or areas directly expose to air and to the weather. 
      F: Dead air spaces, such as peaks of vaulted ceilings or 
Gabled roofs, (where CO may not reach the sensor in time to provide 
early                    warning)
      G: Near deep-cell large batteries. (Large batteries 
Have emissions that can cause the alarm to perform at less than 
Optimum                            performance)
      H: W
here drapes, furniture or other objects block the flour to 
the vents. 
      I:
When wall mounting, place out of reach of children. (Why not to install lower on the wall per Nest.com)
      J: On ceilings less than 6 inches away from the wall.
     
3:  WHAT MODELS DO SDCPM RECOMMEND?   
      Where possible, combination smoke detector and carbon monoxide alarm, Kiddle P3010K.  See SDCPM policy re SMOKE ALARMS
      When a combination detector is NOT needed: Kidde C3010
      (Kidde detectors should be installed on a wall or a table top.  )

4: WHAT IS  THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ALARM AND A DETECTOR? Per San Diego Fire Dept 
      A carbon monoxide alarm is a stand alone unit which tests to Underwriters Laboratory (UL) Standard 2034 and has its own built-in power supply and an audible device. A carbon monoxide detector is a system unit which is tested to UL Standard 2075 and is designed to be used with a fire alarm system and receives its power from the fire alarm panel.

5: WHEN SHOULD THEY BE REPLACED? (5-7 years life but check with manufacturer)

 SEE ALSO SMOKE ALARMS: s.sdcpm.com/smoke

       


SOURCES